Towards LGPD and Beyond – Getting Creative!

In our previous posts on LGPD preparations, we talked about permissioning, data and deliverability, and broadcast strategy. You can do these really well, but your emails will go out during a period of “inbox overload” and face massive competition to attract attention and get opened. In Europe, many subscribers simply gave up, knowing if they ignored the emails they would soon stop! The challenge for Brazilian senders is all about making their LGPD emails stand out, and in this article, we’ll look at effective approaches.

1. Keep Calm & Build Trust

LGPD intends to create greater trust around how personal data is used. As brands update privacy policies and re-permission subscribers, they should consider how they present these changes to their customers. If they are seen to be genuine about how customers will benefit and can explain why in simple, easy-to-understand language, retention efforts will be more successful, and program performance will improve – as we have seen in Europe.

Lloyds Bank did a great job of this:

  • You’re better protected
  • You have more control
  • You can choose who can contact you, and how
  • You can change your mind

Stronger trust levels were clearly reflected by a fall in post-GDPR deleted unread rates for Lloyds’ notification emails, reducing to below 50 percent of previous levels. 

2. Do Take That Tone of Voice With Me!

Many senders in the UK and Europe made the mistake of treating GDPR as a legal exercise, and much of the language was dry and boring – not good for email engagement!

Missguided has a young customer audience, and their approach uses a hip tone of voice with lots of teenage slang – so “WTF is GDPR?” is perfectly natural for this sender! The email goes on to inform readers that a benefit of continued membership will be “free sh*t on their birthdays!” If you know your marketing audience well, there is no reason not to speak in a tone of voice they are familiar with, and comfortable responding to.

Firebox, the online novelty store, has a very quirky way of speaking to customers, and their re-permissioning email was no exception! From the desperate subject line, the “GDPR” (Glorious Discount for Re-subscription) discount offer, and the promise that subscribers’ personal data is “protected by a gang of very stubborn badgers!” –this message was 100% Firebox’s authentic tone of voice, and subscribers loved it!

3. Show Your Creativity!

Senders can take a similar approach with their email creative. Just because LGPD is a legal topic doesn’t mean the emails have to look like legal documents. As next August approaches, there will be huge competition for eye share in crowded inboxes, and email marketers should think innovatively about how to make their emails stand out by using attention-grabbing creative.

Jack Wills ran their re-permissioning campaign with Valentine’s day, with the love affair theme between sender and customers running through the email. Subscribers were encouraged “to stay in our hearts, and on our contact list” and in the live version, the “Click Me” heart was animated, beating gently to attract attention and maximize clicks!

Meantime Brewery used creative personalization to put customers’ names on the beer bottle label, with a message reading “We don’t want to lose you. Sign up and stay with us!” People attach real value to their names and using them in such a high-impact and intriguing way was a big success factor for Meantime.

4. LGPD – The Movie!

The use of video in email has grown—and with good reason. Many email clients now support video, and Campaign Monitor research reports videos in email are known to increase open rates by 19 percent and click-through rates by as much as 65 percent.

We saw some great examples of video in GDPR email campaigns. As part of its “Stay United” campaign, Manchester United football club created animated recordings from several of its stars. Subscribers were encouraged to opt-in to continue hearing about signings, club news, competitions, and ticket availability. These emails were highly successful – our analysis showed read rates 23 percent higher than their benchmark, while spam complaint rates were almost 50 percent lower.

easyJet’s video had the privacy policy taking the form of a pre-flight safety briefing! View the live version here (there is also a Portuguese version if you change the language setting).

Channel 4’s privacy video is also well worth a view. While these videos are light-hearted, taking place in a familiar context and presented in simple, easy to understand language, they also align with Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) recommendations for a “layered” approach to delivering privacy information. Layering means providing a short notice containing key information, and links that expand each section by revealing a second layer with more detailed information.

5. Give Me an Incentive!

We’ve seen several examples where senders incentivized subscribers to continue their involvement. Firebox offered a 10 percent discount on the next purchase, while Manchester United fans were given the chance to win a £250 Megastore voucher.

Note that consent must be freely given, and data controllers should avoid making consent a precondition of a service. However, this doesn’t rule out using incentives and the ICO’s GDPR consent guidance said the following:

There will usually be some benefit to consenting to processing. For example, if joining the retailer’s loyalty scheme comes with access to money-off vouchers, there is clearly some incentive to consent to marketing. The fact that this benefit is unavailable to those who don’t sign up does not amount to a detriment for refusal. However, you must be careful not to cross the line and unfairly penalize those who refuse consent.

Brewdog offered 1 million free beers in return for email sign-ups. The offer was hugely successful, and Brewdog ended it early when massive demand meant they ran out of beer!

Earlier this year I wrote a blog reviewing best-in-class Brazilian email programs to identify what makes them successful. Learnings included making emails informative as well as promotional, using lots of animation, and displaying a great sense of humor. Brazilian email programs also love weaving current affairs into their promotions, and this provides another LGPD opportunity!

In the UK, The Guardian newspaper won DMA awards gold for “Best GDPR Communication” with this clever promotion which combined GDPR consent with Britain’s Brexit debate! (you can also view the silver and bronze winners).

This is the end of my series on “learnings from GDPR” as Brazilian email senders prepare for LGPD. I hope the articles have provided inspiration as you prepare for next August. There’s plenty more GDPR blogs to read, and the Direct Marketing Association also created a wealth of research that is freely available. I also recommend looking at judgments the ICO has been handing down, which shows how the new laws are being interpreted.

Finally – feel free to reach out directly to me, and I’ll be happy to provide more information about the GDPR experiences of UK and Europe’s email marketers! It was a wild ride at times, but many programs are now seeing the benefits of improved performance. Brazilian senders who are willing to embrace LGPD as an opportunity to build better, stronger relationships with their customers should expect to benefit in the same way – start preparing now!

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